$20,000 Micro Fiction Prize

Museum-of-Words-Flash-Fiction-Contest-2017

Image from aerogrammestudio.com

There’s only one week left to submit to the Cesar Egido Serrano Foundation’s Flash Fiction contest. With no entry fee, and a grand prize of $20,000US, there really is absolutely no reason not to enter. At worst, you’ll be two short stories richer than before.

The slogan for the 2017 contest is “The Word, bridging the gap between different cultures and religion,” but there are no restrictions on genre or subject. Entries must be 100 words or less, and submitted via an online form by Thursday, November 23. Writers are limited to two entries.

For further details and updates, visit the competition’s homepage.

Murdoch Mysteries in Victoria

Angela Cowan and Yannick Bisson

Interviewing Yannick Bisson at Cattle Point, Victoria. Photo credit Don Denton, Black Press.

Last month, I found myself on the set of Murdoch Mysteries as they wrapped up their last day of filming in Victoria for this year’s two-hour Christmas special. Aside from meeting Chris Williams (co-director of Big Hero 6) and getting to hold his Oscar, this was my favourite moment so far in my interviewing career.

I’ve been a fan of Murdoch Mysteries for the last ten years, and when I found out they were coming to Victoria to film, I immediately asked my editor if I could do a story on their visit. She gave me the go-ahead, but I still needed to figure out how to get in contact with someone from the show. I didn’t know if I had time to go through the regular channels at CBC, so I rolled up my sleeves and tweeted at executive producer and showrunner Peter Mitchell, and to my delight, he responded that same day. Within three days, I had an interview time and set visit organized. All I needed to do then was figure out how to keep my inner fangirl from bursting out while I interviewed the cast, who turned out to be incredibly gracious and considerate in person.

It was my first visit to a television set, and it was so interesting to get a peek behind the curtain. It definitely gave me a new respect for the actors who go through multiple takes, showing the same level of emotion and authenticity whether they’re saying their lines for the first time or the fifth. Not to mention the pre-sunrise start to the day, the catch-as-catch-can attitude to eating, and the glacial wind knifing in off the water. Any adolescent dreams I may still have been harbouring of being an actress were resoundingly put to bed that day. But, after chatting with one of the writers – probably my favourite conversation of the day – it did get me thinking about writing for the screen. 🙂

Check out the December/January issue of SOAR Magazine next month for the article, here.